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How To Get a Quick Divorce Using iDivorces.co.uk

If there is an agreement to the divorce and your relationship with your spouse is amicable, then it is entirely possible to obtain a quick divorce.


Using traditional high-street solicitors to handle your divorce can end up costing you thousands in legal fees. It can also mean not having a resolution to your divorce for up to 12 months depending on where you live.
 

However, dealing with your divorce doesn’t need to be expensive, stressful, or take a year, at least not when using iDivorces.co.uk to handle your case.

 

Here’s how to get an uncontested, quick divorce;


1.    Ensure your spouse will not defend the divorce
2.    Communicate with your spouse throughout the process
3.    Find your marriage certificate before starting divorce proceedings
4.    Find valid grounds for divorce and agree with your spouse
5.    Ask your spouse to complete and return paperwork efficiently
6.    Ensure all details on the divorce petition are correct
7.    File a D8 divorce petition with the court fee payment


Myths about getting a quick or quickie divorce


It’s been known for other divorce providers to advertise divorce services that finalise in less than 12 weeks. This is very misleading and only causes disappointment. 
 

It is also a myth that one type of divorce is quicker than another, regardless of the reason for divorce or length of separation, they all go through the same court process in the date order they are received.
 

There is an obligatory delay of 6 weeks between the decree nisi and the decree absolute being granted to dissolve your marriage.
 

There are many things that need to happen before you can even get to that stage and 6 weeks is simply not enough time for that to happen, especially since legal aid has been withdrawn and court staff have been reduced.
 

Divorce for most of us is a fairly slow process and according to the latest Government figures on divorce timescales, it takes 23 weeks to reach the decree nisi stage of divorce proceedings.